Mike Birbigulia’s The New One (Broadway show)

Post-show reflection.

His charm had me hooked right away. When Mike walked on, someone in the 7th row centre clapped and pointed so loudly that it rang above everyone’s else’s clapping. Mike immediately told this guy that he was “too drunk for theatre” and I knew then and there that this was going be a special show for me. 

Mike ran through stories of medical issues, sex experiences, his wife’s poems and more. It wasn’t what he talked about, it was the colloquial and softness to his delivery that made me laugh so loud. To be honest, I was worried others would get offended by my outbursts. I tend to watch comedy shows in the comfort of my bedroom with my headphones on and Netflix is the only view I have. So experiencing a live one man comedy show was new for me and I’m so happy I got to fit it in my life. My Saturday night was perfected with this show. I was satisfied, although I didn’t leave with an amazement that I usually do with the theatre. But that’s okay.

There was a moment in the performance where (spoiler alert) a truckload of baby toys falls from the ceiling and onto the once-empty stage. This almost brought tears to my eyes because I felt like I was on a rollercoaster. I was simultaneously nervous for Mike because I was scared he was gonna collapse underneath this heap of paraphernalia, and shocked because the first half of his show consisted of nothing but him and the stage. It was a smart move to add in something extra to wake up the audience, and it was also hilarious to watch him navigate through the maze of stuffed toys and baby products. 

I feel very attached to comedy after this show and it reminds me to take life a little bit more unserious. Nothing has to be stressful if we want to enjoy it. Right? I think this is something my parents never taught me and I hope I find more of this in my journey to being dead.

The Waverly Gallery (Broadway play)

Post-show reflection.

Lots to think about with this show. As an avid musical theatre lover, I have to say this play was a slower pace than I’m used to. That being said, I was engaged the entire show. The dialogue was human. The acting was executed in a humanistic fashion. Kenneth Lonergan’s play was a human in itself. Troubled and lonely, just as each human watching the show has been their whole life. I paid for my ticket and I got my money’s worth.

Michael Cera and Lucas Hedges took the younger perspective to a great depth. I connected with their characters’ feelings more, obviously, because they were just as lost as I would be if an old person was going crazy in front of me. The only similar situation I’ve been through is with an aunt I knew at the ripe age of 8. She died, but I didn’t realize how sad her life had been. I was too ignorant. Having to be the light in someone’s life without even knowing it is so weird. 

Élaine May grabbed the stars with this performance. With every “what” or “huh” that she mustered, her character, Gladys, fell deeper into a state of insanity. From what I saw, Élaine handled this difficult human experience by caring for her character. She let Gladys go to that horrid place but made sure there was a pillow to land on. If she doesn’t get a Tony, I don’t know what will.

Joan Allen and David Cromer as the middle-aged babysitters for Gladys were both sad and hilarious at the same time. I really enjoyed watching them work through the dialogue that was made up of a lot of repeating themselves. It must be exhausting to make sure the second time they said the line, it had more umph to it.

I did notice that the audience laughed a lot. Maybe it was because Alzheimer’s is such a horrendous thing to discuss and so, the natural reaction would be to make a joke of it. I didn’t feel like the play was trying to be funny, in most cases, so being in a crowd of awkwardly giggling people was very strange for me. I tried to just feel my own emotions towards the play but some times I just went along with the group’s decision to laugh.

I can honestly say I feel like I went to a masterclass when watching this show. The professionalism and dedication to the craft had me so inspired to be a performer. I’ll always be a dancer, but this show helped me appreciate the wonderful world of acting.