MOMENTUM Film Critique

The film MOMENTUM boldly describes a man’s connection to movement in an astounding way. Boris Seewald, the director, manages to introduce the principal character, Patrick, without giving away the real secret behind his personality. I was very intrigued from the beginning as to what Patrick wanted to share with the audience, and I felt confused about why the location of an empty house would be the ideal environment for this story-telling. However, his colloquial dialogue and mannerisms gave me the impression that the setting would not matter; he is going to tell an interesting story, nonetheless. As well, the addition of the mother character is brilliant for a half-way twist and keeps the audience engaged as they watch her dance moves and listen to his words.

While Patrick talks to a person who is off-screen, the audience is treated to a very calm opening sequence with no extra sound but Patrick’s cheeky voice. He begins his silly story by talking about nacho chips as being the thing that initiates his urge to dance, and slowly we see that he cannot describe the story unless he moves around. He gets to be at a loss for words, so he starts moving in a frantic manner. Then, he explains that anyone has the tendency to move when the urge comes around and his mom, who sports two elegant outfits, is also included in the dance party. Together, they spin, punch and smile their way around the abandoned house as a music track picks up and leaves are thrown. With the music at a rapid tempo, the two shakers seem to be dancing like no one is watching, and projections are displayed behind them. Patrick finishes by declaring that his inspiration comes from nowhere but a tortilla chip.

The whole film has a nice crescendo to it in that it starts with a quiet conversation with Patrick. The audience is able to hear him on a personal level, and then get transported to his world of movement and drumming. I think it is well-structured in that sense. The message also resonated with me not only as a dancer but as a human because I understand the concept of finding rhythm in any conceivable way. It comes from inside of our bodies, and the story of Patrick’s nacho adventure is very relatable to his audience. As well, I like the use of leaves and in some ways, the leaves are also a character. When they are tossed up, it shows a clear example of momentum and randomness, similar to Patrick and his mother’s moves.

In terms of what I did not like, I am confused about why it is shot in what seems to be an empty house. It feels too bland and does not make sense as to why Patrick would be telling this story in this location. The characters are blocked off from the rest of the world by being in a closed setting. In my opinion, it should have been shot outside in a park where we could see other people walking by or stopping to join the dance party. Also, due to the fact that his story is about a high school dance, I feel as though the music that is played in the background is too intense and probably would not be the song playing at the disco. A better choice would be a pop song that could bring life to his story a bit better, instead of using drumming noise that reminds me too much of tribal dancing.

To conclude, I am amazed at how a simple story can be so captivating and why the director chose such a unique inspiration within a nacho chip to make a film. As well, I think the actors were so committed to the outburst of dancing and held nothing back, which made the message very clear: movement can come from anywhere. Although the location and music did not quite match the film’s charming personality, in my opinion, I think the film did a wonderful  job of starting off slow and building up to a climatic and exciting ending.

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